Police-population seminar organized in collaboration with Espoir 18 in Paris

On October 11th and 12th, a seminar on improving police-population dialogue took place in Paris, as a result of a collaboration between ICPC and the Parisian association Espoir 18. The objective of this seminar was to present successful initiatives undertaken internationally on this type of dialogue, through round tables, an audience of academics, police officers, and civil society actors.

Since 2019, ICPC and Espoir 18 have been working closely together on a project on improving police-population dialogue, with a particular focus on the young public and minority groups in their relationship with the police institution. This partnership is therefore part of a research on ways to improve this type of dialogue, to document innovative experiences and practices at the international level and to promote knowledge transfer.  This year, several activities were carried out as part of this collaboration: a review of international good practices was co-authored, ICPC hosted the Espoir 18 team in Montreal as part of its North American theatre tour, and this seminar which took place in October.

The seminar included :

  • The presentation of the practice review “Improving Police-Population Dialogue: An Introduction to International Issues and Practices” produced by ICPC and Espoir 18, with the support of the Open Society Foundations;    
  • The presentation of successful national (in France) and international initiatives along with round table discussions;    
  • The screening and debate of a documentary made by the young of Espoir 18 on racial profiling; 
  • Stories of young people, families, and police officers on the relationship between the police and the population; 
  • An evening debate on possible solutions to improve the police-population dialogue and a future action plan to be put in place.  

The development of an action plan for the period 2023 to 2025 based on the exchanges and lessons learned from the seminar will be produced for the next phase of this collaboration.

Chronicle of the ICPC on France 24

The ICPC was invited to participate in a science segment on the France 24 channel which focused on the knowledge of Canadian ways to detect and prevent the risks of delinquency among young children.

In this interview, Anne Vandelle, analyst and coordinator of activities and projects at ICPC, focuses on the work that can be done around a set of protective factors in young children. These can have a positive impact on children, specifically on their safety and sense of security. Through a few examples of programs, we highlight the importance of offsetting risk factors with protective factors, such as physical and mental health, and the feeling of of safety, in order to prevent the risk of delinquency from childhood.    

To watch the interview “Crime prevention: Scientific methods help protect minors and their families”:  https://bit.ly/3h9Gy5f 

 

A Youth Strategy Action Plan developed by VSP

The borough of Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension (VSP) mandated the ICPC to develop an analysis of the causes identified and the existing protective factors surrounding the violence committed and suffered by young users of François-Perrault Park in Montreal. It is on the basis of the causes identified and the recommendations of the ICPC experts in violence prevention that the Borough developed its Youth Crime Prevention Strategy.   

In addition, VSP has granted hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund numerous projects by partner organizations that support young people aged 12 to 25 on its territory. All of the projects suggested by VSP are directly linked to the strategy, particularly in terms of the following objectives:  

  • To further promote social inclusion and participation of young people  
  • Promote positive role models and pathways to success  
  • Equip young people to manage their emotions and develop social and interpersonal skills
  • Strengthen parenting skills and competencies  

For more information, download the Action Plan here (the Action Plan is only available in French) 

RÉSAL community of practice activities

The ICPC remains actively involved in the process of developing a community of practice with the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support, RÉSAL) on the prevention of violence committed and suffered by youth aged 12 to 25 in Montreal. To follow up on the training sessions offered in the fall of 2021, a series of six clinical activities were organized in November and December to continue the conversation started between community workers in prevention.

These clinical supervision activities aimed to promote cooperation and horizontal knowledge transfer allowing organizations with important practice needs to find support and adapted methodological guidance. The activities were organized around the following themes:

  • Violence prevention in street gangs | November 25th and December 2nd, 2021
  • Sexual violence prevention | November 26th and December 14th, 2021
  • Street work and youth intervention | November 25th and December 9th, 2021

These sessions created a safe space to exchange on ethical dilemmas and/or professional isolation. The significance of these clinical activities was extensively appreciated by the participants. First, they offered a reflective dimension that furthered their practice allowing them to question their reflexes and to share their worries and their difficulties. Second, these activities created knowledge and recognition connections between workers from different backgrounds and areas of work, an aspect essential to the improvement of common work and to the better mutual understanding of each other’s challenges.

Overall, these training sessions and clinical activities of the RÉSAL’s community of practice reached 95 participants mostly from community organizations in and around Montreal.

New ICPC publications

The ICPC recently published several reports tackling violence committed and suffered by the youth of Montreal. Specifically, three reports are now available:

1) Problem-Services Arrangement Analysis Report on the Prevention of Violence Committed and Suffered by Young Users of François-Perrault Park in the Saint-Michel Neighbourhood

The Villeray–Saint-Michel–Parc-Extension borough of Montreal mandated the ICPC to analyze the identified causes and existing protective factors around violence committed and suffered by the young users of the François-Perrault park. The objective of this report is to present and analyze issues relating to this type of violence and how to prevent it.

2) Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by the Youth of Montreal

This ICPC report, mandated by the city of Montreal as part of the Urban Safety Laboratory’s activities, presents an overview of urban safety with respect to violence committed and suffered by youth throughout the island of Montreal.

3) Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by Youth in the Montreal-North Borrough

The Montreal-North borough mandated the ICPC and a team of sociology experts, Mariam Hassaoui from Université TÉLUQ and Victor Armony from UQAM, to do an urban safety audit of violence committed and suffered by youth of 12 to 25 years of age in Montreal-North including a detailed portrait (ADS+ and place-based approach) of the environment (physical, socio-economic, and social-health) in which they evolve, of the crime and violence committed and suffered by this youth, and of the available resources in the area.

See a full list of the thematic reports published by the ICPC

These reports are only available in French.

The ICPC takes part in a forum on violence prevention in youth

On December 7th, the ICPC took part in the first day of the forum Montréal sécuritaire pour les jeunes : dialogue sur l’intervention en prévention de la violence (Montreal Safe for Youth: Dialogue on violence prevention and intervention) to present an overview of the chapters and highlights of the “Rapport sur la violence commise et subie chez les jeunes de Montréal” (Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by the Youth of Montreal), a recent publication by the ICPC. This meeting of community and institutional partners involved in prevention aimed to:

  • Create a common understanding of the violence phenomenon;
  • Discuss youth resilience in a context in which the feeling of safety is important;
  • Take stock of the most recent data on risk factors of violence in Montreal;
  • Highlight the best prevention initiatives;
  • Foster collaboration and the development of an integrated vision among stake holders in violence prevention in youth;
  • Work together around specific issues in violence prevention and fuel the municipal conversation on urban safety;
  • Counter the phenomenon of committed and suffered violence.

The meeting was organized by the Montreal Service de la diversité et de l’inclusion sociale (Service for Social Diversity and Inclusion – SDIS) in collaboration with the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support – RESAL), of which the ICPC is a coordinating member, and the Institut du nouveau nonde (New World Institute – INM).

The other presentations of the forum included panelists from the Service de police de la ville de Montréal (Montreal Police Department – SPVM), L’Anonyme, and the Institut universitaire Jeunes en difficulté (At Risk Youth University Institute – IUJD) of the Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal (Integrated University Center for Social Services of the South Center of the Island of Montreal – CIUSSS), ICPC partners.

The ICPC invited to an SPVM meeting in Saint-Michel

On November 30th, the ICPC had the pleasure of attending a presentation of the strategic plan for fighting gun violence and of the Équipe de concertation communautaire et de rapprochement (Team for Community Dialogue and the Development of Closer Ties – ECCR) given by the Service de police de la ville de Montréal (City of Montreal Police Department – SPVM), an ICPC partner, in collaboration with the neighbourhood station #30 of the Saint-Michel neighbourhood.

Concerning gun violence, the SPVM presented the current situation in Montreal and the main directions taken by the strategic plan for fighting gun violence. In particular, the SPVM highlighted the importance of collaborating with the community when it comes to the prevention of gun violence.

This meeting with the community was also an opportunity to meet the new ECCR that has been deployed since April 2021 in many areas of Montreal. This unit aims to connect with citizens and community organizations to find common and sustainable solutions to current or emerging issues around social cohabitation and urban safety.

The event was also an opportunity to introduce several local initiatives in which the neighbourhood station #30 is involved, in particular, those aiming to develop closer ties with the community, especially with youth.

Training session for community workers offered by the RÉSAL

As part of the development of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support, RÉSAL)’s community of practice, of which ICPC is a member and the coordinator, a fourth training session in a series of activities planned this fall was held on November 11th. This training session mainly addressed community workers in Montreal to introduce methods of approach, of contact, and of intervention in street work for people working with youth and with people living in difficult situations.

The activity was hosted by Maxime Bonneau, clinic coordinator and trainer for PACT de rue, a community organization and RÉSAL member that works directly with youth and people in difficulty to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent risk behaviors.

The following subjects were discussed:

  • The definition and history of street work;
  • How to do field observation;
  • How to integrate a living environment well;
  • How to master intervention methods.

More information about other training sessions offered:

Violence prevention in street gangs

Sexual violence prevention

Online hate prevention

These training sessions were carried out with the financial support of the City of Montreal.

New employee joins the ICPC team

In early November, we welcomed a new employee to the ICPC: Rose Germain.

Rose, Research Assistant Intern, is in her last year of a bachelor’s degree in psychology (Laval University) and has experience working with youth. Indeed, she has worked for Entraide Jeunesse Québec as a facilitator of a support group for teenage volunteers with anxiety disorders.

She will support the team in its role in the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (RÉSAL). Welcome!

Training session on sexual violence prevention offered by the RÉSAL

As part of the development of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support, RÉSAL)’s community of practice, of which ICPC is a member and the coordinator, a second training session in a series of activities planned this fall, was held on October 28. It focused on the prevention of sexual violence and aimed to explore the importance of language and of certain concepts in sexual violence prevention and review legal aspects and helpful attitudes for field workers.

The activity was hosted by Katherine Lapierre, project manager for the sex education programme and counselor for L’Anonyme, a RÉSAL member that works to promote safe behaviour and egalitarian relationships among youth.

Among the highlights of the workshop, there were:

  • The importance of inclusive language in prevention and interventions among youth to create a safer environment and to limit stigmatization.
  • The many shapes and forms in which violence can appear in day-to-day life without necessarily being recognized as such by the victims or by the perpetrators (sexual coercion, harassment, stealthing, etc.).
  • Despite a common misconception, around 2% of complaints around sexual assault are false accusations. This fact contrasts with a common vision that tends to easily question the account of victims.
  • Lastly, although a number of tools exist to accompany youth on this topic, how workers react to the disclosure of violence (listening, interest, trust) remains key for the following procedure with victims.

More information about other training sessions offered:

Violence prevention in street gangs

Online hate prevention

Street work and youth intervention

These training sessions were carried out with the financial support of the City of Montreal.