Youth mediation training offered by RÉSAL

As part of the development of the community of practice of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (RÉSAL), of which the ICPC is a member and coordinator, a second training of the 2nd thematic cycle of the activities was held last May 18. This training aimed at introducing the concept of mediation and provided an opportunity for participants to become familiar with various theoretical and practical tools in order to facilitate the process.   

The activity was carried out by Maxime Bonneau, clinical coordinator and trainer for PACT de rue, Déborah Griot, project coordinator, and Myriam, street worker with PACT de rue, a community organization member of RÉSAL that acts directly with youth and people in difficulty.  

In addition, a clinical supervision activity following this second cycle thematic training took place on June 1st. This first clinical space allowed participants to recall the main components of the mediation process, the prerequisites for its implementation as well as the main communication techniques that were discussed during the training and to apply them in real-life situations. The second clinical supervision activity will be held on June 22.   

Some of the highlights from the training included:  

  • The importance of differentiating between the concepts of mediation, conciliation, and arbitration, as well as choosing the most appropriate option for each context. The process, the purpose and the roles of each party will differ depending on the option considered and the issue to be addressed.   
  • Mediation is a communicative process, in which the parties have an active and central role. The purpose of the mediation process is not necessarily linked to reaching an agreement or a decision, but rather will be discussed in the course of the exchange between the parties.   
  • The person taking on the role of mediator must be impartial, a good listener and act as a facilitator to encourage the parties’ introspection.   
  • Several communication techniques such as active listening, mirroring or positive reinforcement can be used.   
  • The mediation process, which itself is divided into several more or less flexible stages, benefits from preparatory meetings with each of the parties, allowing them to be informed about the process, to validate their informed consent and to be prepared for the various eventualities.   

So far, the activities of this second thematic cycle “Mediation with youth” have reached 25 workers from Montreal community organizations working in the prevention of youth violence.  

Training on youth violence prevention through sport and the arts offered by the RÉSAL

As part of the development of the community of practice of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (RÉSAL), of which the ICPC is a member and coordinator, a series of activities were launched this spring. A first training session of the first thematic cycle was held on May 12. The objective of this training was to highlight the importance of an approach based on sports or artistic practices in the prevention of violence and the creation of a bond of trust with young Montrealers. It also provided an opportunity to discuss the lessons learned, successes and potential challenges that can be encountered in this type of approach.  

The activity was facilitated by Nicolas Barbeau-Lachance, founder and coordinator of the school of intervention through martial arts and combat sports at RAP Jeunesse and Cloé Daguet, counselor at the organization La Collective.  

In addition, two clinical supervision activities of the 1st thematic cycle took place on May 19 and June 2. These clinical spaces aim to promote mutual aid and the horizontal transfer of knowledge by providing organizations with strong practices needs to find support and methodological coaching. 

Some of the highlights of the training include:

  • The Theatre of the Oppressed (TOP) is a participatory, supportive, and demanding practice that mobilizes the body as a vehicle for a message. It creates change and provides a framework for collective reappropriation and awareness on a variety of issues.  
  • Martial arts and combat sports can be a tool to support the modification of violent behaviors in young people, but also to be used for collective empowerment for certain at-risk or vulnerable populations.  
  • Although they are two disciplines that at first glance seem rather distant, i.e. combat sports and TOP, similarities and shared challenges in terms of intervention can be raised. Through body and movement, these practices require young people to learn continuously and to master themselves in order to act on interpersonal violence or to intervene on oppression.  

Furthermore, the success of both disciplines requires active and sustained participation from the practitioners and the young people in order to be part of a long-term follow-up and intervention approach.  

  • It is beneficial for practitioners to name and introduce the underlying objectives of the intervention to the young people through the practice of sports or artistic activities, in order to preserve and strengthen the bond of trust. 

The activities of this first cycle reached 25 workers from Montreal community organizations working to prevent juvenile violence.  

ICPC organised a visioning activity

In line with the 2020-2030 Climate Plan and the implementation of Montréal’s Resilient City Strategy, the City of Montreal has decided to support the creation of resilience centres within its territory. This initiative, carried out through the Tandem programme, aims to equip communities to deal with issues of social justice, urban security, and climate change that can have a lasting impact on them.

In this context, the ICPC was mandated to provide methodological support to the project leaders and the team in charge of piloting the implementation of resilience poles in 5 sectors of the municipality: Ahuntsic-Cartierville/St-Laurent, Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Saint-Léonard, Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension and Rivière-Des-Prairies-Pointe-aux-Trembles.

With this in mind, on April 29, the ICPC met with the resilience agents, the pilot team, for a visioning activity in the context of the development of community resilience poles.

The purpose of this activity was to better understand the implementation of resilience clusters and the resilience agents over time, to put them in a situation where they were faced with different prospective scenarios, and to define the first milestones for the intervention of the clusters in the short, medium and long term.

We would like to thank all the resilience officers for their participation.

The ICPC took part in a forum on Racism, Antiracism and Indigenous Issues, organized by the IRIPI

On March 17 and 18, the ICPC had the pleasure of attending the forum on Racism, Antiracism and Indigenous Issues, organized by the Institut de Recherche sur l’Intégration Professionnelle des Immigrants (IRIPI). This forum aimed to advocate collective mobilization by addressing manifestations of racism. It also aimed to shed light on the progress and blind spots that persist in many areas.

Several presentations were made, providing information on Aboriginal issues in various settings: schools, CEGEPs, universities and workplace. Good practices as well as guides for intervention and research in Aboriginal environments were also shared.

Thank you for the invitation.

The ICPC took part in the second day of the Forum on the fight against gun violence

On March 31, 2022, the ICPC was pleased to attend the second day of the Forum montréalais pour la lutte contre la violence armée : s’unir pour la jeunesse (Montreal Forum on Combating Gun Violence: Uniting for Youth), organized by the SPVM and the City of Montreal. The objectives of this forum were to:

  1. Promote communication between institutional and community partners working with Montreal youth;
  2. Identify levers to encourage collaboration and find concrete solutions, taking into account the mission and expertise of each partner;
  3. Develop a concerted Montreal model that mobilizes all stakeholders.

During the day, strategic partners presented themselves in order to establish common commitments to counter the phenomenon of gun violence. The influence of social media and the need to share information were also discussed during the event.

“The fight against gun violence requires a global response”, emphasized the SPVM. ” Therefore, we must all contribute, each in our own way, according to our respective roles, missions, and expertise. We all have a responsibility to make commitments that will bring about change for Montreal’s youth.”

For more information: https://sync-stream.tv/spvm_forum/

The ICPC participates in a meeting of the CORIM

The ICPC is pleased to have attended the presentation “L’impulsion donnée par la nouvelle Vision internationale : le Québec en plein essor!” organized by the Conseil des relations internationales de Montréal (CORIM) of the Minister of International Relations and La Francophonie, Mrs. Nadine Girault, which focused, among other things, on Quebec’s place in the international arena in relation to Quebec’s International Vision.

We would like to thank the CORIM for the invitation.

A new RÉSAL publication

The Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and public action support, RÉSAL), coordinated by the ICPC, has published its 12th bulletin. This bulletin discusses safety in and around emergency shelter structures and poses the question of how to promote a human-centred approach.

This publication draws a portrait of the current state of emergency shelters in Montreal, reflects on the complexity of security within the context of emergency services for the homeless, describes the problem of social cohabitation, looks at other problems specific to these services’ clientele, presents an approach to be developped, explores the limits of private security, and situates the issue within COVID-19 and its related health measures.

Read the bulletin (available in French)

A new intern at the ICPC

In early January, the ICPC welcomed a new member to its team: Mavrick Langlois.

Mavrick, Research Assistant Intern, is currently in his third and last year of a bachelor’s degree in Criminology at the Université de Montréal, Analysis profile. He has experience as a research assistant from the International Centre for Comparative Criminology and also works part time as a case management assistant at the Société de criminology du Québec. As part of his internship, he will work on violence prevention in a school environment. Welcome Mavrick!

A new employee joins the ICPC

This month, the ICPC welcomed a new employee: Janny Montinat.

Janny, Research Assistant, has a master’s in international law and politics from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Through working on many projects, she has gained experience in multilateral cooperation, digital rights, and personal data protection in Africa. Moreover, she is particularly interested in citizen engagement, public policy analysis, and issues related to human mobility. Welcome to the team!

RÉSAL community of practice activities

The ICPC remains actively involved in the process of developing a community of practice with the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support, RÉSAL) on the prevention of violence committed and suffered by youth aged 12 to 25 in Montreal. To follow up on the training sessions offered in the fall of 2021, a series of six clinical activities were organized in November and December to continue the conversation started between community workers in prevention.

These clinical supervision activities aimed to promote cooperation and horizontal knowledge transfer allowing organizations with important practice needs to find support and adapted methodological guidance. The activities were organized around the following themes:

  • Violence prevention in street gangs | November 25th and December 2nd, 2021
  • Sexual violence prevention | November 26th and December 14th, 2021
  • Street work and youth intervention | November 25th and December 9th, 2021

These sessions created a safe space to exchange on ethical dilemmas and/or professional isolation. The significance of these clinical activities was extensively appreciated by the participants. First, they offered a reflective dimension that furthered their practice allowing them to question their reflexes and to share their worries and their difficulties. Second, these activities created knowledge and recognition connections between workers from different backgrounds and areas of work, an aspect essential to the improvement of common work and to the better mutual understanding of each other’s challenges.

Overall, these training sessions and clinical activities of the RÉSAL’s community of practice reached 95 participants mostly from community organizations in and around Montreal.