ICPC has published a review of the literature and practices for the prevention of armed violence

Gun violence is on the rise in the Montreal metropolitan area, but also throughout Quebec (Larin 2022), and cold weapon violence is still common. However, several tragic events involving firearms have compelled the Quebec government to invest in the fight against this type of violence.

This review of literature and practice is part of these efforts to better understand the phenomenon of armed violence. It also seeks to share knowledge and experiences from measures put in place around the world to curb violence. However, armed violence is a complex phenomenon that involves more than one issue. Therefore, it is important to adopt the appropriate prevention strategies depending on the context in which armed violence is addressed in order to intervene in a comprehensive and targeted manner.

This report presents four issues that may result in weapon-related acts: 

  • Suicide and self-inflicted violence;
  • Armed violence among delinquent or criminalized youth groups;
  • Intimate partner violence;
  • Incidents related to violent extremism.

This report provides insight and understanding of crime data collected under the Quebec Department of Public Safety's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR 2.2) rules from 2015 to 2020.  

Read the report here (in French)

Presentation of two reports to the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the City of Montreal has experienced a sharp increase in certain firearm-related crimes, most of which involve young people. This issue, which must be addressed through a multi-sectoral approach and which must benefit from a concerted vision, is of particular concern to the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM). The SPVM, therefore, contacted the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime in order to develop its integrated plan to combat gun violence and improve its practices.

On October 27th, ICPC was invited to present highlights of two recently published reports addressing different issues related to gun violence, the first one focusing on the glorification of firearms on social media and the second one on the prevention of gun violence.

This meeting was an opportunity for the team to share best practices from the literature, but also to exchange with 14 members of the SPVM’s internal committee of experts on the issue of the rise of gun-related violence in Montreal, on the initiatives to be implemented at the community level as well as on social media in order to prevent such violence.  

Thank you to the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal for the invitation.

ICPC participated in an episode of ”Cap sur 2030”

With the significant increase in armed violence in Montreal, which has been a major issue for several years, a question has been raised: How can we strengthen the social fabric in Montreal? Panelists invited to a special segment on the program Cap sur 2030, in which the ICPC was invited to participate, attempted to answer this question.

Michelle Côté, Director of Research at ICPC, discussed the topic with Ted Rutland, Associate Professor of Geography with a focus on municipal policy, urban planning, and urban safety in Canada, affiliated with Concordia University and a member of the Anti-Carceral Group; Louis Audet-Gosselin, Scientific and Strategic Director of the Centre for the Prevention of Radicalization Leading to Violence; and Malika Saher, lawyer and Senior Mediator at the Dr. Julien Foundation. Together, they suggested solutions to preserve and strengthen social ties in Montreal in the coming years.

Cap sur 2030 is a program on MATV that brings together a number of experts and professionals in the field to discuss inspiring and innovative ideas for building the future of Montreal for the benefit of the community and its citizens.

To watch the episode (in French): https://matv.ca/montreal/mes-emissions/cap-sur-2030/comment-solidifier-le-tissu-social-a-montreal

Participation of ICPC at the City of Montreal’s event “À présent, le grand rendez-vous montréalais sur la solidarité, l’équité et l’inclusion”

On October 18, 2022, ICPC had the pleasure of attending the event À présent, le grand rendez-vous montréalais sur la solidarité, l’équité et l’inclusion, organized by the City of Montreal, as part of the deployment of its Solidarity, Equity and Inclusion Action Plan 2021-2025. It was an opportunity for the city to present its five major action areas for the future, the successes of the participating organizations, and to look at the objectives to be reached in the coming years.   

Thank you to the City of Montreal for the invitation.   

Participation of ICPC in a presentation of the results of a research report on Street harassment in Montreal

On September 22, 2022, ICPC was pleased to attend the presentation of the highlights of the research report Le harcèlement de rue à Montréal : un portrait statistique de la pluralité des expériences, des manifestations et des contextes” (Street harassment in Montreal: a statistical portrait of the multiplicity of experiences, manifestations and contexts). These results revealed the extent of the phenomenon of street harassment in Montreal through the analysis of residents’ experiences, using an intersectional approach. Then followed recommendations addressed to various institutional actors.   

This partnership research was carried out by researchers from the University du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), the Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO), the Université de Montréal (Udem) and the Centre d’éducation et d’action des femmes (CÉAF), as part of UQAM’s Service aux collectivités.   

To read the full report:   

Thank you, onece again, to the Centre d’éducation et d’action des femmes (CÉAF) for the invitation.   

Practice review – Community policing policies

As part of the review of the community-based policing policy introduced in Quebec in 2000, the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime was mandated by the Quebec Ministry of Public Safety to produce an international review of literature on the evolution of public policies on community policing, and to highlight some of the innovative practices that are taking place in Europe and in Quebec.  

The main objective of this report is to provide a state of knowledge on the implementation of public policies related to the implementation of community policing.  

Read the report (only available in French)

The visit of the CJGM Director of Special Projects to the ICPC

On July 25, 2022, the ICPC hosted Ms. Arij Riahi, Director of Special Projects at the Clinique juridique du Grand Montréal (Greater Montreal Legal Clinic – CJGM), at its offices in Downtown Montreal, to discuss the issues of insecurity affecting the borough of Montreal North. The meeting was part of a research project initiated this summer by the ICPC, which aims to map the services offered in the northeast part of the Island of Montreal – the boroughs of Montreal North, Rivières-des-Prairies-Pointe-aux-Trembles, Saint-Léonard, and Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension – in terms of prevention of armed violence. Subjects discussed at the meeting included the place of young people in the borough, issues that have emerged since the pandemic, and possible solutions to issues related to gun violence. 

We would like to thank Ms. Riahi for participating in the meeting. 

Youth mediation training offered by RÉSAL

As part of the development of the community of practice of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (RÉSAL), of which the ICPC is a member and coordinator, a second training of the 2nd thematic cycle of the activities was held last May 18. This training aimed at introducing the concept of mediation and provided an opportunity for participants to become familiar with various theoretical and practical tools in order to facilitate the process.   

The activity was carried out by Maxime Bonneau, clinical coordinator and trainer for PACT de rue, Déborah Griot, project coordinator, and Myriam, street worker with PACT de rue, a community organization member of RÉSAL that acts directly with youth and people in difficulty.  

In addition, a clinical supervision activity following this second cycle thematic training took place on June 1st and June 22. These clinical spaces allowed participants to recall the main components of the mediation process, the prerequisites for its implementation as well as the main communication techniques that were discussed during the training and to apply them in real-life situations.    

Some of the highlights from the training included:  

  • The importance of differentiating between the concepts of mediation, conciliation, and arbitration, as well as choosing the most appropriate option for each context. The process, the purpose and the roles of each party will differ depending on the option considered and the issue to be addressed.   
  • Mediation is a communicative process, in which the parties have an active and central role. The purpose of the mediation process is not necessarily linked to reaching an agreement or a decision, but rather will be discussed in the course of the exchange between the parties.   
  • The person taking on the role of mediator must be impartial, a good listener and act as a facilitator to encourage the parties’ introspection.   
  • Several communication techniques such as active listening, mirroring or positive reinforcement can be used.   
  • The mediation process, which itself is divided into several more or less flexible stages, benefits from preparatory meetings with each of the parties, allowing them to be informed about the process, to validate their informed consent and to be prepared for the various eventualities.   

So far, the activities of this second thematic cycle “Mediation with youth” have reached 25 workers from Montreal community organizations working in the prevention of youth violence.  

Training on youth violence prevention through sport and the arts offered by the RÉSAL

As part of the development of the community of practice of the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (RÉSAL), of which the ICPC is a member and coordinator, a series of activities were launched this spring. A first training session of the first thematic cycle was held on May 12. The objective of this training was to highlight the importance of an approach based on sports or artistic practices in the prevention of violence and the creation of a bond of trust with young Montrealers. It also provided an opportunity to discuss the lessons learned, successes and potential challenges that can be encountered in this type of approach.  

The activity was facilitated by Nicolas Barbeau-Lachance, founder and coordinator of the school of intervention through martial arts and combat sports at RAP Jeunesse and Cloé Daguet, counselor at the organization La Collective.  

In addition, two clinical supervision activities of the 1st thematic cycle took place on May 19 and June 2. These clinical spaces aim to promote mutual aid and the horizontal transfer of knowledge by providing organizations with strong practices needs to find support and methodological coaching. 

Some of the highlights of the training include:

  • The Theatre of the Oppressed (TOP) is a participatory, supportive, and demanding practice that mobilizes the body as a vehicle for a message. It creates change and provides a framework for collective reappropriation and awareness on a variety of issues.  
  • Martial arts and combat sports can be a tool to support the modification of violent behaviors in young people, but also to be used for collective empowerment for certain at-risk or vulnerable populations.  
  • Although they are two disciplines that at first glance seem rather distant, i.e. combat sports and TOP, similarities and shared challenges in terms of intervention can be raised. Through body and movement, these practices require young people to learn continuously and to master themselves in order to act on interpersonal violence or to intervene on oppression.  

Furthermore, the success of both disciplines requires active and sustained participation from the practitioners and the young people in order to be part of a long-term follow-up and intervention approach.  

  • It is beneficial for practitioners to name and introduce the underlying objectives of the intervention to the young people through the practice of sports or artistic activities, in order to preserve and strengthen the bond of trust. 

The activities of this first cycle reached 25 workers from Montreal community organizations working to prevent juvenile violence.  

ICPC organised a visioning activity

In line with the 2020-2030 Climate Plan and the implementation of Montréal’s Resilient City Strategy, the City of Montreal has decided to support the creation of resilience centres within its territory. This initiative, carried out through the Tandem programme, aims to equip communities to deal with issues of social justice, urban security, and climate change that can have a lasting impact on them.

In this context, the ICPC was mandated to provide methodological support to the project leaders and the team in charge of piloting the implementation of resilience poles in 5 sectors of the municipality: Ahuntsic-Cartierville/St-Laurent, Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Saint-Léonard, Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension and Rivière-Des-Prairies-Pointe-aux-Trembles.

With this in mind, on April 29, the ICPC met with the resilience agents, the pilot team, for a visioning activity in the context of the development of community resilience poles.

The purpose of this activity was to better understand the implementation of resilience clusters and the resilience agents over time, to put them in a situation where they were faced with different prospective scenarios, and to define the first milestones for the intervention of the clusters in the short, medium and long term.

We would like to thank all the resilience officers for their participation.