A new RÉSAL publication

The Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and public action support, RÉSAL), coordinated by the ICPC, has published its 12th bulletin. This bulletin discusses safety in and around emergency shelter structures and poses the question of how to promote a human-centred approach.

This publication draws a portrait of the current state of emergency shelters in Montreal, reflects on the complexity of security within the context of emergency services for the homeless, describes the problem of social cohabitation, looks at other problems specific to these services’ clientele, presents an approach to be developped, explores the limits of private security, and situates the issue within COVID-19 and its related health measures.

Read the bulletin (available in French)

The ICPC takes part in an international conference on security

The ICPC was invited by the International Union of Railways (UIC), an ICPC partner, to take part in the 16th UIC World Security Congress held online on December 9th. The theme of the conference was the organization of security during major events, and subjects discussed included international cooperation during major events, lessons learned from UIC members, and emerging threats to transport security.

The ICPC’s presentation focused on its experience in preventing violence resulting from radicalization in an urban mobility context.

New ICPC publications

The ICPC recently published several reports tackling violence committed and suffered by the youth of Montreal. Specifically, three reports are now available:

1) Problem-Services Arrangement Analysis Report on the Prevention of Violence Committed and Suffered by Young Users of François-Perrault Park in the Saint-Michel Neighbourhood

The Villeray–Saint-Michel–Parc-Extension borough of Montreal mandated the ICPC to analyze the identified causes and existing protective factors around violence committed and suffered by the young users of the François-Perrault park. The objective of this report is to present and analyze issues relating to this type of violence and how to prevent it.

2) Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by the Youth of Montreal

This ICPC report, mandated by the city of Montreal as part of the Urban Safety Laboratory’s activities, presents an overview of urban safety with respect to violence committed and suffered by youth throughout the island of Montreal.

3) Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by Youth in the Montreal-North Borrough

The Montreal-North borough mandated the ICPC and a team of sociology experts, Mariam Hassaoui from Université TÉLUQ and Victor Armony from UQAM, to do an urban safety audit of violence committed and suffered by youth of 12 to 25 years of age in Montreal-North including a detailed portrait (ADS+ and place-based approach) of the environment (physical, socio-economic, and social-health) in which they evolve, of the crime and violence committed and suffered by this youth, and of the available resources in the area.

See a full list of the thematic reports published by the ICPC

These reports are only available in French.

The ICPC takes part in a forum on violence prevention in youth

On December 7th, the ICPC took part in the first day of the forum Montréal sécuritaire pour les jeunes : dialogue sur l’intervention en prévention de la violence (Montreal Safe for Youth: Dialogue on violence prevention and intervention) to present an overview of the chapters and highlights of the “Rapport sur la violence commise et subie chez les jeunes de Montréal” (Report on Violence Committed and Suffered by the Youth of Montreal), a recent publication by the ICPC. This meeting of community and institutional partners involved in prevention aimed to:

  • Create a common understanding of the violence phenomenon;
  • Discuss youth resilience in a context in which the feeling of safety is important;
  • Take stock of the most recent data on risk factors of violence in Montreal;
  • Highlight the best prevention initiatives;
  • Foster collaboration and the development of an integrated vision among stake holders in violence prevention in youth;
  • Work together around specific issues in violence prevention and fuel the municipal conversation on urban safety;
  • Counter the phenomenon of committed and suffered violence.

The meeting was organized by the Montreal Service de la diversité et de l’inclusion sociale (Service for Social Diversity and Inclusion – SDIS) in collaboration with the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support – RESAL), of which the ICPC is a coordinating member, and the Institut du nouveau nonde (New World Institute – INM).

The other presentations of the forum included panelists from the Service de police de la ville de Montréal (Montreal Police Department – SPVM), L’Anonyme, and the Institut universitaire Jeunes en difficulté (At Risk Youth University Institute – IUJD) of the Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal (Integrated University Center for Social Services of the South Center of the Island of Montreal – CIUSSS), ICPC partners.

The ICPC invited to an SPVM meeting in Saint-Michel

On November 30th, the ICPC had the pleasure of attending a presentation of the strategic plan for fighting gun violence and of the Équipe de concertation communautaire et de rapprochement (Team for Community Dialogue and the Development of Closer Ties – ECCR) given by the Service de police de la ville de Montréal (City of Montreal Police Department – SPVM), an ICPC partner, in collaboration with the neighbourhood station #30 of the Saint-Michel neighbourhood.

Concerning gun violence, the SPVM presented the current situation in Montreal and the main directions taken by the strategic plan for fighting gun violence. In particular, the SPVM highlighted the importance of collaborating with the community when it comes to the prevention of gun violence.

This meeting with the community was also an opportunity to meet the new ECCR that has been deployed since April 2021 in many areas of Montreal. This unit aims to connect with citizens and community organizations to find common and sustainable solutions to current or emerging issues around social cohabitation and urban safety.

The event was also an opportunity to introduce several local initiatives in which the neighbourhood station #30 is involved, in particular, those aiming to develop closer ties with the community, especially with youth.

Job offer: Analyst – Urban safety

The ICPC is looking for an Analyst in Urban Safety. Their job will include contributing to the development and implementation of various urban safety projects and taking charge of the collection and analysis of data related to their designated projects. They will be expected to contribute to the development of innovative practices in urban safety and multi-stakeholder participation and co-construction processes and to proactively participate in the development of the organization by providing scientific and technical input to the ICPC team.

The deadline for applying is November 30th, 2021. Applications closed.

Launch of the RÉSAL’s community of practice

The ICPC had the pleasure of organizing the launch of a series of workshops and activities offered by the Réseau d’échange et de soutien aux actions locales (Network for exchange and local action support, RÉSAL) as part of the development of its community of practice. Supported by the city of Montreal, this process aims to provide a bigger space for the sharing knowledge and experience around different forms of violence committed and suffered by youth aged 12 to 25. It is specially targeted at community workers in the North-East of the island of Montreal to equip them to deal with various problems met in their daily activities.

For the first theme of the fall on violence prevention in street gangs, the local stakeholders were able to attend a day-long workshop given by René-André Brisebois, instructor and lecturer at the University of Montreal for the last decade, and Professional Coordinator of the Institut universitaire jeunes en difficulté (IUJD)’s Center of Expertise.

Aiming to deconstruct common prejudices around street gangs and criminalized youth networks, the workshop highlighted some key aspects:

  • The ethnicized dimension of the term “street gang” and the complex reality of this phenomenon;
  • The social and personal characteristics pf gang members, as well as the affiliation and disaffiliation trajectories of youth within these groups;
  • The most effective approaches, preventive actions, and interventions for preventing the joining of gangs and for reducing related crimes.

Overall, around 15 participants were present at the workshop given at the BAnQ Grande bibliothèque and all sanitary recommendations were followed. This first workshop will be followed by clinical supervision activities this fall to delve deeper into the issues raised from the fieldworkers’ experience.

More information about other training sessions offered:

Sexual violence prevention

Online hate prevention

Street work and youth intervention

These training sessions were carried out with the financial support of the City of Montreal.

The ICPC takes part in a CMNCP conference on urban safety

On Tuesday, October 5th, the ICPC was on a panel as part of the virtual conference: “Community Safety in the Midst of a Global Pandemic: Who Are We Leaving Behind?” organized by the Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention (CMNCP), an ICPC partner, that took place from October 4th to 6th, 2021, gathering nearly 80 participants.

The session in which the ICPC took part was called “Eradicating Violence: Essentials That Do Not Leave People Behind” and discussed community safety and crime prevention, as well as an evidence-based and inclusive approach to violence prevention. Questions discussed included:

  • What are the evidence-based solutions that should be more used in Canada?
  • How to implement these solutions?
  • What can we learn from cities that succeeded in making changes necessary to succeed?
  • Can we learn from cities like London, UK, that applied a public health model to violence prevention?

The ICPC would like to thank the CMNCP for the invitation.

The ICPC participates in an SPVM workshop on police intervention policy

On Tuesday September 28th, the ICPC took part in a workshop lead by the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (Montreal police department, SPVM) on police intervention policy. Adopted in July 2020, the Politique sur les interpellations policières marks an important cultural turning point and provides a framework for the organization’s intervention practices. The SPVM is the first police force in Quebec to implement such a policy.

Among the issues discussed at the workshop, a focus was put on the following themes:

  • The difference between social interactions, interventions, police stops, custody for questioning, and arrests;
  • Legal issues related to various police practices;
  • The application context for and the issues related to the newly implemented intervention form.

This workshop aimed to demystify police intervention practices and to educate the public on the practical implications of the new policy in the SPVM. We thank the SPVM and the Borough of Saint-Léonard for inviting us to take part in this workshop and to exchange with local actors.

The ICPC participates in a conference on urban safety in a pandemic

The ICPC is invited to participate in the virtual conference “Community Safety in the Midst of a Global Pandemic: Who Are We leaving behind?” organized by the Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention (CMNCP), an ICPC partner. The ICPC will be part of a panel called “Eradicating Violence: Essentials That Do Not Leave People Behind” on October 5, from 11 AM to 12:30 PM (EST).

This conference will be held from October 4 to 6, 2021, and aims to support urban and rural municipalities and indigenous communities, organizations, groups, and individuals in their crime prevention and urban safety efforts in the communities and areas where they live. The conference will address many questions including the notion of safety, the COVID-19 pandemic’s effects on urban safety, links between systemic issues such as racism or social justice, and urban safety and the prevention of hate and violent extremism. The deadline for signing up is October 1, 2021.

Learn more and sign up: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/cmncp-2021-virtual-conference-tickets-160796082411