The ICPC takes part in a CMNCP conference on urban safety

On Tuesday, October 5th, the ICPC was on a panel as part of the virtual conference: “Community Safety in the Midst of a Global Pandemic: Who Are We Leaving Behind?” organized by the Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention (CMNCP), an ICPC partner, that took place from October 4th to 6th, 2021, gathering nearly 80 participants.

The session in which the ICPC took part was called “Eradicating Violence: Essentials That Do Not Leave People Behind” and discussed community safety and crime prevention, as well as an evidence-based and inclusive approach to violence prevention. Questions discussed included:

  • What are the evidence-based solutions that should be more used in Canada?
  • How to implement these solutions?
  • What can we learn from cities that succeeded in making changes necessary to succeed?
  • Can we learn from cities like London, UK, that applied a public health model to violence prevention?

The ICPC would like to thank the CMNCP for the invitation.

The ICPC participates in an SPVM workshop on police intervention policy

On Tuesday September 28th, the ICPC took part in a workshop lead by the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (Montreal police department, SPVM) on police intervention policy. Adopted in July 2020, the Politique sur les interpellations policières marks an important cultural turning point and provides a framework for the organization’s intervention practices. The SPVM is the first police force in Quebec to implement such a policy.

Among the issues discussed at the workshop, a focus was put on the following themes:

  • The difference between social interactions, interventions, police stops, custody for questioning, and arrests;
  • Legal issues related to various police practices;
  • The application context for and the issues related to the newly implemented intervention form.

This workshop aimed to demystify police intervention practices and to educate the public on the practical implications of the new policy in the SPVM. We thank the SPVM and the Borough of Saint-Léonard for inviting us to take part in this workshop and to exchange with local actors.

The ICPC participates in a conference on urban safety in a pandemic

The ICPC is invited to participate in the virtual conference “Community Safety in the Midst of a Global Pandemic: Who Are We leaving behind?” organized by the Canadian Municipal Network on Crime Prevention (CMNCP), an ICPC partner. The ICPC will be part of a panel called “Eradicating Violence: Essentials That Do Not Leave People Behind” on October 5, from 11 AM to 12:30 PM (EST).

This conference will be held from October 4 to 6, 2021, and aims to support urban and rural municipalities and indigenous communities, organizations, groups, and individuals in their crime prevention and urban safety efforts in the communities and areas where they live. The conference will address many questions including the notion of safety, the COVID-19 pandemic’s effects on urban safety, links between systemic issues such as racism or social justice, and urban safety and the prevention of hate and violent extremism. The deadline for signing up is October 1, 2021.

Learn more and sign up: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/cmncp-2021-virtual-conference-tickets-160796082411

New employee joins ICPC team

In early September, we welcomed a new employee to the ICPC: Florilène Cornier.

Florilène, analyst and project officer, holds a double master’s degree in political science (Sciences Po Aix) and urban planning (University of Montreal) and is actively interested in issues related to improving citizens’ living environment and strengthening their capacity to act on their environment.

With the ICPC, she will be specialized in urban management and multi-stakeholder participation. Welcome!

Local safety portrait presented to the Montreal North borough

At the end of 2020, the ICPC, in collaboration with sociologists Mariam Hassaoui (TELUQ) and Victor Armony (UQAM), started developing a local safety portrait of violence committed and suffered by youth in the borough of Montreal North. This portrait should better identify the needs of youth between 12 and 25 years of age in Montreal North and, in 2021, support a call for collaborative projects acting on contributing factors of violence in youth such as:

  • Violence in intimate and sexual relationships;
  • Physical, verbal, and psychological violence;
  • Sense of belonging and trust in authority figures.

These elements have been analysed in four contexts: private, academic, external public, and internal public, and take the gender of the presumed perpetrators and of the victims into account.

The local safety portrait was presented in several instances throughout the month of June:

  1. To the borough’s executive committee;
  2. To the borough’s local government;
  3. To the procedure’s steering committee.

By taking stock of violence committed and suffered by youth, this portrait will lay the foundation for concerted action.

New publication from an ICPC partner

The UNESCO Chair in Prevention of Radicalisation and Violent Extremism (UNESCO-PREV Chair), Sherbrooke University, partner of the ICPC, has recently published a report titled "Constraints and opportunities in evaluating programs for prevention of violent extremism: how the practitioners see it". This report is based on semi-directed interviews conducted in an earlier study by the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime (ICPC) (Madriaza, Ponsot, & Marion, 2017) and on a focus group conducted by the UNESCO-PREV Chair in Ottawa, Canada, in March 2019.

To read the report: Constraints and opportunities in evaluating programs for prevention of violent extremism: how the practitioners see it 

New Guide – DataJam Against Exploitation: Participant Handbook

As part of the DataJam Against Exploitation 2021, the first online innovation competition in Canada, a “Participant Handbook” was developed and published. The event, financed by the Government of Canada, was organized in partnership between the ICPC, Fundación Pasos Libres, IBM, and the UNODC.

The handbook was adapted and translated collaboratively by the Fundación Pasos Libres, the ICPC and the UNODC from an earlier version published by Fundación Pasos Libres, with the support of IBM Corporate Social Responsibility, as part of the training materials for the DataJam Pasos Libres Online 2020, the first international contest of its kind, also on human trafficking.

The DataJam Against exploitation, held in May 2021, aimed to develop technological solutions to spot and fight human trafficking in Canada, especially the trafficking of youth, indigenous people, and members of the LGBTQI+ community. The contest also hoped to increase public awareness of human trafficking, to improve participants knowledge and resources, and to further intersectoral and interdisciplinary collaboration. The handbook contains three explanatory modules offering the reader an introduction to human trafficking in Canada and related issues, an overview of data’s importance in the fight against this crime, and case studies.

The first module, Introduction to Human Trafficking, discusses means of exploitation, risk factors, and recruitment and control methods. It also takes a brief look at different forms of legislation aimed at the prevention of human trafficking.

The second module, Human Trafficking and Data, explores the importance of data in the fight against human trafficking. It gives a few examples of key industries and compelling data as well as certain data security and protection considerations.

The last module, Case Studies / Cases of Success, is on three organizations and initiatives that used the power of data and collaboration to prevent and fight human trafficking.

Download: DataJam Against Exploitation: Participant Handbook